The Battle Of Los Angeles (1942)

A photograph of the battle of LA as it appeared in the Los Angeles Times

In the night of February 24th/25th 1942, air raid sirens rang out throughout Los Angeles County shortly after midnight. Being wartime, civilians and military personnel alike had some idea of what to expect – after all, Pearl Harbor had occurred a mere three months prior, so residents of the area prepared for the worst. Civilians were ordered to stay inside and black out all lights and windows.

Just after 3am, ground-based anti-aircraft artillery was mobilized and began firing large caliber shells at an unidentified aircraft that was reported to be flying low and steady in the vicinity of Los Angeles. The object was said to be large and saucer-shaped and took no evasive action throughout the barrage. The Air Force was alerted but stayed grounded. From the ground, all manner of guns and searchlights were aimed at the aircraft as per the article photograph, but despite having a secure lock on the target, none of the guns or bombs utilized appeared to do any significant damage. In fact, the only damage sustained was to local infrastructure – that and the casualties (five) were the result of the shrapnel ricocheting back to Earth and the ensuing chaos of the incident as a whole. Over 1400 shells were fired at the unidentified object but even that was not enough to bring it down.

The shelling continued until approximately 4:15am on February 25th with the blackout ultimately lifted at 7:20am, when the all-clear was finally given.

Aftermath

Speculation was swift and rampant following the highly unusual incident. Many people had initially suspected a Japanese attack, but following World War II, the Japanese government issued a statement saying it had not flown any aircraft over the Los Angeles area in the years prior. With that, many were left wondering what on Earth had occurred on that night in February 1942. Witnesses told local newspapers that bombs and gunfire seemed to bounce off or explode shortly before making contact with the object – as if it were somehow shielded or otherwise protected by unknown forces.

The craft was seen by hundreds of thousands of witnesses in total, making it one of the most significant UFO sightings in U.S. history. The incident remains a mystery to this day. Considering that even all these years later we do not know of a single aircraft capable of withstanding the type of attack launched upon this strange object, we can only surmise that it was not of this world. At no point did it appear to have any form of hostile intent. Instead, it flew at a leisurely pace and simply traveled beyond the range of the gunfire, effectively ending the incident.

Using technology that is clearly far beyond anything we can replicate on Earth surely indicates the object in question was otherworldly. The protection system alone is utterly remarkable, and many people at the time suspected a cover up of some kind. This theory gained traction after a Navy secretary by the name of Frank Knox stated that the incident was a “false alarm” immediately following the strange encounter. But what type of false alarm could lead to so much chaos in the Los Angeles area? Some speculated a practice raid, but that seems equally unlikely. A column in a local newspaper, the Long Beach Independent, read “there is a mysterious reticence about the whole affair and it appears that some form of censorship is trying to halt discussion on the matter.”

With even the press suspecting a cover up, we are forced to admit that no mundane explanation we can think up appears to fit the bill in this particular instance. Frank Knox of the Navy went on to attribute the event to “war nerves” but again, an altercation of some magnitude clearly took place, regardless of what officials would have us believe.

We should also bear in mind that this incident occurred in a time in which the notion that an unidentified craft could be alien in nature was far from widespread. Having occurred even five years before the Roswell, New Mexico crash, it was many years later that researchers and Ufologists began to work with the evidence provided and put two and two together.

Inevitably, there have been countless efforts to discredit this incident and steer it away from the extraterrestrial sphere, but the facts don’t lie. There is no terrestrial object that could have made it through the barrage this object sailed through, and countless witnesses in the Los Angeles area can’t all be wrong.

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2 Comments

  1. You are right, they would not.

    So, something was there and as it was not a craft belonging to the Japanese or another known ennemy, where dit it come from?

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